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First Castro on "The Simpsons" Repudiated Communism; Now the Real Castro Does the Same






The clip is from the "embed" option of YouTube, and is apparently from The Simpsons episode "The Trouble with Trillions" which Wikipedia says ". . . is the twentieth episode of the ninth season of the animated television series The Simpsons, which originally aired April 5, 1998."


After viewing the above clip from YouTube, and reading the quote below from the NYT, you may be excused for concluding that the best way to learn what Castro is really thinking is to watch the Simpsons:


(p. A6) Jeffrey Goldberg wrote in his blog for Atlantic magazine that he asked Mr. Castro, . . . , last week if Cuba's model of Soviet-style Communism was still worth exporting to other countries. "The Cuban model doesn't even work for us anymore," Mr. Castro said, according to the report. Mr. Goldberg said that Julia Sweig, a Cuba expert at the Council on Foreign Relations, thought Mr. Castro's answer was an acknowledgment that the state played too big a role in the economy. The comment appeared to reflect Mr. Castro's support for the economic reforms instituted by his younger brother, President Raúl Castro.


For the full story, see:

REUTERS. "Cuba: Communist Economic Model Loses a Stalwart Defender." The New York Times (Thurs., September 9, 2010): A6.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the article has the date September 8, 2010.)


I ran across the Simpson Castro clip on ("The Lede; Blogging the News With Robert Mackey.")





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