« Texas Was a Place Where It Was OK for an Entrepreneur to Be Poco Loco | Main | First Principle for Trustbusters Should Be "Do No Harm" »


Entrepreneur Krupp Was Paternalistically "Benevolent" and Was Skeptical of Capitalism



KrupBK2012-05-17.jpg











Source of book image: online version of the WSJ review quoted and cited below.








(p. A13) Harold James, professor of history and international affairs at Princeton University, portrays a vastly different organization in "Krupp," a painstaking chronicle of a company that traces its roots to a steel foundry in Essen in 1810. Mr. James's Krupp is a company for which the manufacturing of war matériel was always of secondary interest to that of civilian production. The company might have preferred to concentrate on manufacturing railroad equipment and consumer goods, but in the developing and expansionist German empire of the 19th century, state requirements for the tools of power dovetailed with Krupp's desire for regular long-term contracts. The result for Krupp was a practical, if not deliberate, focus on armaments.

From the manufacturer's perspective, the emphasis on war matériel did not consign Krupp to the ranks of belligerent militarists; it was just smart business. "The purpose of work should be the common good," founder Alfred Krupp once said, or at least that quote graces a statue the company erected after his death in 1887. All through the 19th century, Mr. James says, the pursuit of profit was less central to the Krupp mission than building a solid enterprise within a framework of social responsibility. As early as 1836, Krupp established a voluntary health-insurance program for its workers. By the middle of the century, life-insurance and pension plans had been instituted. Workers' hostels and company hospitals were constructed. In exchange for this paternalistic benevolence, Krupp expected complete loyalty from its work force and vehemently opposed the slightest hint of union organization or political activity among its employees.

"Alfred Krupp perfectly fits the mold of the heroic entrepreneur," Mr. James writes. "Profoundly skeptical of joint-stock companies, banks, and capitalism in general, but also of big-scale science and modern research methods, he was a genius at extending to its utmost limits the possibilities of the craft entrepreneur."



For the full review, see:

JENNIFER SIEGEL. "BOOKSHELF; Heavy Industry, Burdened Past; The company's 19th-century founder said it was devoted to the "common good." In World War II, it worked hard for the Third Reich." The Wall Street Journal (Tues., April 17, 2012): A13.

(Note: the online version of the interview is dated April 16, 2012.)






Post a comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

HP3D5006CropSmall.jpg


















The StatCounter number above reports the number of "page loads" since the counter was installed late on 2/26/08. Page loads are defined on the site as "The number of times your page has been visited."


View My Stats