« MOOCs "Will Really Scale" Once Credible Credentialing Process Is Mastered | Main | Cities Provide Children "Options for Their Future" »


Paul Allen's Account of the Founding of Microsoft



idea-man-paul-allenBK2013-05-12.jpg
















Source of book image: http://www.entrepreneur.com/dbimages/slideshow/idea-man-paul-allen.jpg



(p. C6) The first half of "Idea Man" sets forth Mr. Allen's version of the Microsoft creation myth, depicting Mr. Gates as a petulant, ambitious and money-minded mogul-to-be and Mr. Allen as an underappreciated visionary. Pictures of them from the 1970s and early '80s also tell this story, making Mr. Allen look like a hirsute, powerful older brother and Mr. Gates like a kid.


. . .


"Idea Man" is long overdue. It turns out to be as remote, yet as surpassingly strange, as its author, whose receipt of a diagnosis of Stage 4 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2009 has made it that much more important for him to tell his story. Though it is written in the smoothly proficient style of many a collaborator-assisted memoir, it is a book filled with wild extremes: breakthrough, breakup, power, indulgence, blue-sky innovation. And it winds up offering Mr. Allen's guarded, partial answer to a universal question: what if you could make your wildest dreams come true?



For the full review, see:

JANET MASLIN. "BOOKS OF THE TIMES; The Reclusive Other Half of Microsoft's Odd Couple Breaks His Silence." The New York Times (Tues., April 19, 2011): C6.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the review has the date April 18, 2011.)


The book under review is:

Allen, Paul. Idea Man: A Memoir by the Cofounder of Microsoft. New York: Portfolio, 2011.






Post a comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

HP3D5006CropSmall.jpg


















The StatCounter number above reports the number of "page loads" since the counter was installed late on 2/26/08. Page loads are defined on the site as "The number of times your page has been visited."


View My Stats