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"Et La Liberté!"



(p. C7) [A] milestone in the diary comes in 1943 when [Guéhenno's] students are drafted into compulsory work service in Germany; many escape to Spain or join resistance groups. Nor was Guéhenno exempt from the repression. That same year he was demoted by the Vichy education minister to the rank of a beginning instructor, assigned to teach 17 hours of class a week rather than the usual six and faced with supervising hundreds of students. "Stammering with fatigue," he wondered how he would have time to keep his diary going. But he cheered up whenever he contemplated how many of the authors in his curriculum were bona fide revolutionaries: "Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, Danton, Robespierre, Chénier, Hugo, Michelet ..., I have nothing to discuss but suspects." He liked to end his class sessions by shouting "Et la liberté!"


For the full review, see:

Alice Kaplan. "Shedding Light on Nazi-Occupied Paris." The New York Times (Thurs., JUNE 26, 2014): C7.

(Note: ellipsis in original; words in brackets were added.)

(Note: the online version of the review has the date JUNE 25, 2014.)


The book being reviewed is:

Guéhenno, Jean. Diary of the Dark Years, 1940-1944: Collaboration, Resistance, and Daily Life in Occupied Paris. Translated by David Ball. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.






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