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Delta and Atlanta Protect Their Huge Hartsfield-Jackson Airport from Little Silver Comet Field



(p. B6) DALLAS, Ga. -- Airports do not get much smaller than Silver Comet Field at Paulding Northwest Atlanta Airport, where an undeveloped two-lane road weaves to a church-quiet setting framed by small hills.

On a recent weekday morning, four small business jets were planted on the tarmac, if it can be called that. Nine automobiles dotted the parking lot, most of them driven there for a meeting. Outside the two-story building that serves as the terminal, which was reminiscent of a lodge in off-peak season, there was no sign of human life.

Only 50 miles away sits the world's most bustling airport, Hartsfield-Jackson. It maintains a monopoly on commercial flights in Atlanta, the largest metropolitan region without a secondary airport.

Paulding Northwest would like to change that grip on the market. The airport has applied for a commercial license so it can introduce two flights a week, and has since encountered stiff opposition.

Leading the charge against the bid is the Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines, which averages about 1,000 daily departures from its sprawling hub.

But the airport's supporters are crying foul, saying that Delta, along with the city of Atlanta, which owns Hartsfield-Jackson, has managed to throw up a series of barriers, legal and political, against the bid.



For the full story, see:

MIKE TIERNEY. "Fighting for 2 Fights a Week." The New York Times (Tues., DEC. 23, 2014): B6.

(Note: the online version of the story has the date DEC. 22, 2014, and has the title "Tiny Airport Fights for Sliver of Atlanta Market.")






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