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"Red Tape Is Good for the Government but Not for Us Chinese People"



(p. A8) China's seven million public servants have long been a target of scorn by citizens who accuse them of endemic laziness and corruption. Last year, a municipal water official in Hebei Province with a history of turning off the taps of customers who refused to pay kickbacks -- including an entire village -- was detained after investigators found $20 million hidden in his home.

In the southwestern province of Yunnan, officials at a local land reclamation bureau often leave for lunch around 10:30 a.m., returning after 3 p.m. "It simply gets too hot to do any work," Pan Yuwen, an agricultural adviser, said one rainy day last month when the temperature was a less-than-sultry 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

But more than lackadaisical bureaucrats, it is the head-spinning tangle of regulations that infuriates many ordinary Chinese. At the heart of their ire is the hukou, or family registration, an onerous system akin to an internal passport that often tethers services like public education, subsidized health care and pensions to a Chinese citizen's parents' birthplace -- even if he or she never lived there.


. . .


One recent afternoon, Li Ying, 39, sat in a fluorescent-lit Beijing government office, waiting for her number to be called so she could apply for a temporary residence permit that would allow her 6-year-old son to enroll in school.

Although Ms. Li moved to Beijing with her parents as a child in 1981, her hukou is registered in a distant town, meaning her son will be shut out of the city's public schools without the permit.

Among the 14 required documents, Ms. Li must provide her hukou certificate, proof of residence, a diploma, a job contract, a marriage license, her husband's identity card, his hukou, a certificate proving that she has only one child and a company document detailing her work performance and tax payments.

"What a headache," she said, a pile of paperwork balanced on her lap. "Red tape is good for the government but not for us Chinese people."



For the full story, see:

DAN LEVIN. "China's Middle Class Chafes Against Maze of Red Tape." The New York Times (Sat., MARCH 14, 2015): A4 & A8.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date MARCH 13, 2015.)







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