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EU Regulations Frustrate Innovation



(p. A13) The EU is a supranational government run in a fundamentally undemocratic, indeed antidemocratic, way. It has four presidents, none of them elected. Power to initiate legislation rests entirely with an unelected commission. Its court can overrule our Parliament.


. . .


. . . today, Britain--the most outward-facing of the major European economies--will thrive if it leaves. . . .

This is because the EU's obsession with harmonization (of currency and rules) frustrates innovation. Using as an excuse the precautionary principle or the need to get 28 countries to agree, the EU gets in the way of the new. "Technological progress is often hindered or almost impossible in Europe," says Markus Beyrer, director general of BusinessEurope, a confederation of industry groups. Consequently, we've been left behind in digital technology: There are no digital giants in Europe to rival Amazon, Google, Apple and Facebook.

The EU is also against free trade. It says it isn't, but its actions speak louder. The EU has an external tariff that deters African farmers from exporting their produce to us, helping to perpetuate poverty there, while raising prices in Europe. The EU confiscated Britain's right to sign trade agreements--though we were the nation that pioneered the idea of unilateral free trade in the 1840s. All the trade agreements that the EU has signed are smaller, as measured by the trading partners' GDP, than the agreements made by Chile, Singapore or Switzerland. Those the EU has signed usually exclude services, Britain's strongest sector, and are more about regulations to suit big companies than the dismantling of barriers.

Even worse than in Westminster or Washington, the corridors of Brussels are crawling with lobbyists for big companies, big banks and big environmental pressure groups seeking rules that work as barriers to entry for smaller firms and newer ideas. The Volkswagen emissions scandal came from a big company bullying the EU into rules that suited it and poisoned us. The anti-vaping rules in the latest Tobacco Products Directive, which will slow the decline of smoking, came from lobbying by big pharmaceutical companies trying to defend the market share of their nicotine patches and gums. The de facto ban on genetically modified organisms is at the behest of big green groups, many of which receive huge grants from Brussels.



For the full commentary, see:

MATT RIDLEY. "The Business Case for Brexit; Britain will thrive outside the EU, free from Brussels' regulation and empowered to cut its own trade deals." The Wall Street Journal (Weds., JUNE 22, 2016): A13.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date JUNE 21, 2016.)






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