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The Most Popular Kremlin Line



(p. A4) In an interview, Mr. Gorbachev shrugged off the fact that 25 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, he remains among the most reviled men in Russia. "It is freedom of expression," he said.


. . .


Some adore him for introducing perestroika, or restructuring, combined with glasnost, or openness, which together helped to jettison the worst repressions of the Communist system. Mr. Gorbachev led the way, albeit haltingly, toward free speech, free enterprise and open borders.

"Some love him for bringing freedom, and others loathe him for bringing freedom," said Dmitri Muratov, the editor of Novaya Gazeta, one of the few remaining independent newspapers and one in which Mr. Gorbachev holds a 10 percent stake.


. . .


Mr. Muratov said they often recounted the same joke, based on Mr. Gorbachev's infamous campaign to lower alcohol consumption:

Two men are standing in a long, long vodka line prompted by the limited supply. One asks the other to keep his place in line, because he wants to go over the Kremlin to punch Gorbachev in the face for his anti-alcohol policy. He comes back many hours later and his friend asks him if he had indeed punched Gorbachev. "No," the man answered despondently. "The line at the Kremlin was even longer."



For the full story, see:

NEIL MacFARQUHAR. "Reviled, Revered, and Still Challenging Russia to Evolve." The New York Times (Thurs., JUNE 2, 2016): A4.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date JUNE 1, 2016, and has the title "Reviled by Many Russians, Mikhail Gorbachev Still Has Lots to Say.")






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