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"To Understand Zoning, You Have to Have a Law Degree"



(p. 27) Not all buildings are worth keeping. In Midtown East, many nonconforming structures have low ceilings and columns that make them unappealing to new businesses. Some developers have gone so far as to demolish all but the bottom quarter of their buildings, and then build up from there, allowing them to retain the old zoning for their plots so as not to sacrifice a single square foot. The city is currently reconsidering a proposal that would allow these buildings to be rebuilt to their original size and possibly even larger.

It does not have to be this complicated. In honor of the code's 100th anniversary, the Municipal Art Society of New York has called on City Hall to consider overhauling the code in a way that would make it intelligible to all.

"To understand zoning, you have to have a law degree, it's so convoluted and so dense," Mike Ernst, director of planning at the civic group, said. "The whole process of how buildings get built these days is so confusing and opaque to people. There really should be more transparency, so people can have an understanding of what the future holds for their city."



For the full story, see:

"Reviled, Revered, and Still Challenging Russia to Evolve." The New York Times, First Section (Sun., MAY 22, 2016): 27.

(Note: the online version of the story has the date MAY 20, 2016, and has the title "40 Percent of the Buildings in Manhattan Could Not Be Built Today." It is substantially longer than the print version and includes three authors, while no authors were listed for the print version. The authors listed for the online version were: QUOCTRUNG BUI, MATT A.V. CHABAN and JEREMY WHITE.)






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