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Chinese Government Executes Farmer Who Killed Official for Destroying His House



(p. A9) . . . when Mr. Zhou heard last week that the Chinese government had executed the farmer, Jia Jinglong, he was furious. He saw it as a sign that the ruling Communist Party was imposing harsh punishments on the most vulnerable members of society while coddling the well-connected elite.

"The legal system isn't fair," Mr. Zhou, 57, said, adding that local officials had "turned against the common people."

President Xi Jinping has made restoring confidence in Chinese courts a centerpiece of his rule, vowing to promote "social justice and equality" in a legal system long plagued by favoritism and abuse.


. . .


But the furor over the execution of Mr. Jia, who had sought revenge on officials for demolishing his home, has raised doubts about Mr. Xi's efforts, with people across the country publicly assailing inequities in the justice system and asking why high-level officials often escape the death penalty.

"The perception is that the people are powerless and vulnerable against corrupt officials," said Fu Hualing, a law professor at the University of Hong Kong. "What is surprising is that Xi Jinping has been in power for four years, and that narrative has not changed."



For the full story, see:

JAVIER C. HERNÁNDEZ. "Villager's Execution in China Ignites an Uproar Over Inequality of Justice." The New York Times (Mon., NOV. 21, 2016): A9.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date NOV. 20, 2016, and has the title "Villager's Execution in China Ignites Uproar Over Inequality of Justice.")






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