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The Case Against "Mindful Dishwashing"



(p. 9) I'm making a failed attempt at "mindful dishwashing," the subject of a how-to article an acquaintance recently shared on Facebook. According to the practice's thought leaders, in order to maximize our happiness, we should refuse to succumb to domestic autopilot and instead be fully "in" the present moment, engaging completely with every clump of oatmeal and decomposing particle of scrambled egg. Mindfulness is supposed to be a defense against the pressures of modern life, but it's starting to feel suspiciously like it's actually adding to them. It's a special circle of self-improvement hell, striving not just for a Pinterest-worthy home, but a Pinterest-worthy mind.

Perhaps the single philosophical consensus of our time is that the key to contentment lies in living fully mentally in the present. The idea that we should be constantly policing our thoughts away from the past, the future, the imagination or the abstract and back to whatever is happening right now has gained traction with spiritual leaders and investment bankers, armchair philosophers and government bureaucrats and human resources departments.


. . .


So does the moment really deserve its many accolades? It is a philosophy likely to be more rewarding for those whose lives contain more privileged moments than grinding, humiliating or exhausting ones. Those for whom a given moment is more likely to be "sun-dappled yoga pose" than "hour 11 manning the deep-fat fryer."

On the face of it, our lives are often much more fulfilling lived outside the present than in it.


. . .


Surely one of the most magnificent feats of the human brain is its ability to hold past, present, future and their imagined alternatives in constant parallel, . . .


. . .


What differentiates humans from animals is exactly this ability to step mentally outside of whatever is happening to us right now, and to assign it context and significance. Our happiness does not come so much from our experiences themselves, but from the stories we tell ourselves that make them matter.


. . .


So perhaps, rather than expending our energy struggling to stay in the Moment, we should simply be grateful that our brains allow us to be elsewhere.



For the full commentary, see:

RUTH WHIPPMAN. "Actually, Let's Not Be in the Moment." The New York Times, SundayReview Section (Sun., NOV. 27, 2016): 9.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date NOV. 26, 2016.)







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