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Automation Raises Productivity, Consumer Spending, and Creates New Jobs



(p. B1) Since the 1970s, when automated teller machines arrived, the number of bank tellers in America has more than doubled. James Bessen, an economist who teaches at Boston University School of Law, points to that seeming paradox amid new concerns that automation is "stealing" human jobs. To the contrary, he says, jobs and automation often grow hand in hand.

Sometimes, of course, machines really do replace humans, as in agriculture and manufacturing, says Massachusetts Institute of Technology labor economist David Autor in a succinct and illuminating TED talk, which could have served as the headline for this column. Across an entire economy, however, Dr. Autor says that's never happened.


. . .


(p. B4) . . . a long trail of empirical evidence shows that the increased productivity brought about by automation and invention ultimately leads to more wealth, cheaper goods, increased consumer spending power and ultimately, more jobs.

In the case of bank tellers, the spread of ATMs meant bank branches could be smaller, and therefore, cheaper. Banks opened more branches, and in total employed more tellers, Mr. Bessen says.



For the full commentary, see:

CHRISTOPHER MIMS. "KEYWORDS; Automation Actually Can Lead to More Job Creation." The Wall Street Journal (Mon., Dec. 12, 2016): B1 & B4.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date Dec. 11, 2016, and has the title "KEYWORDS; Automation Can Actually Create More Jobs.")


Bessen more fully presents his ATM example in his book:

Bessen, James. Learning by Doing: The Real Connection between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015.







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