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Pope Francis Has "a Great Allergy to Economic Things"



(p. A7) ABOARD THE PAPAL AIRPLANE -- Pope Francis has dedicated his papacy to the plight of the poor and delivered severe critiques of economic systems that benefit the rich. But flying back to Rome from his eight-day visit to Latin America, Francis admitted he had overlooked a group.

He has delivered few messages for the global middle class.

"Thank you," he replied, after a German journalist, Ludwig Ring-Eifel, asked about the omission. "It's a good correction, thanks. You are right. It's an error of mine not to think about this."


. . .


In fact, the pope expressed "a great allergy to economic things," explaining that his father had been an accountant who often brought work home on weekends.

"I don't understand it very well," he said of economics, even though the issue of economic justice has become central to his papacy.


. . .


"Then, on the middle class, there are some words that I've said -- but a little in passing," he said, musing. "But talking about the common people, the simple people, the workers, that is a great value, no? But I think you're telling me about something I need to do. I need to delve further into this."



For the full story, see:

JIM YARDLEY. "In His Focus on Rich and Poor, Pope Admits to Overlooking the Middle Class." The New York Times (Tues., JULY 14, 2015): A7.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date JULY 13, 2015, and has the title "Pope Francis Says He's Overlooked the World's Middle Class.")






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