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"More Women in Their 60s and 70s" Work in Fulfilling Jobs



(p. 1) Kay Abramowitz has been working, with a few breaks, since she was 14. Now 76, she is a partner in a law firm in Portland, Ore. -- with no intention of stopping anytime soon. "Retirement or death is always on the horizon, but I have no plans," she said. "I'm actually having way too much fun."

The arc of women's working lives is changing -- reaching higher levels when they're younger and stretching out much longer -- according to two new analyses of census, earnings and retirement data that provide the most comprehensive look yet at women's career paths.


. . .


Most striking, women have become significantly more likely to work into their 60s and even 70s, often full time, according to the analyses. And many of these women report that they do it because they enjoy it.


. . .


Nearly 30 percent of women 65 to 69 are working, up from 15 percent in the late 1980s, one of the analyses, by the Harvard economists Claudia Goldin and Lawrence Katz, found. Eighteen per-(p. 4)cent of women 70 to 74 work, up from 8 percent.


. . .


Of those still working, Ms. Goldin said, "They're in occupations in which they really have an identity." She added, "Women have more education, they're in jobs that are more fulfilling, and they stay with them." (Ms. Goldin happens to be an example of the phenomenon, as a 70-year-old professor and researcher.)



For the full story, see:

Claire Cain Miller. "With More Women Fulfilled by Work, Retirement Has to Wait." The New York Times, First Section (Sun., FEB. 12, 2017): 1 & 4.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the article has the date FEB. 11, 2017, and has the title "More Women in Their 60s and 70s Are Having 'Way Too Much Fun' to Retire.")


The paper by Goldin and Katz, mentioned above, is:

Goldin, Claudia, and Lawrence F. Katz. "Women Working Longer: Facts and Some Explanations." NBER Working Paper #22607. National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc., Sept. 2016.






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