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People Root for Billionaires If They Believe They Also Could Become Billionaires



(p. 22) "Billions" manages the feat of making you want the guy who has everything to have even more.

"People still root for billionaires because it reinforces the idea that they can do it too," Mr. Kirshenbaum said recently. "People don't want to be in a place where there's not a lot of magic left in the equation." Political analysts have long given this explanation for why poor or working-class people vote against tax increases for the wealthy: They want to believe that some day they, too, will have assets to guard.


. . .


Like the TV series, the film "The Big Short" puts you in the position of wanting the investors -- or at least the investors depicted on the screen -- to win. The movie channels your anger at the banks that came up with the perilous financial instruments that devastated the economy, but it leaves you no room to despise the charmingly eccentric rogue geniuses who made hundreds of millions of dollars shorting the housing market. All that hard work, the culling of documents and the fact-gathering trips to endangered Sun Belt real estate markets -- it would be so wrong if they didn't triumph in the end. Institutions are greedy; people are merely obsessed.



For the full commentary, see:

GINIA BELLAFANTE. "Big City; Rooting for the Robber Barons, at Least Those Onscreen." The New York Times, First Section (Sun., MARCH 20, 2016): 22.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date MARCH 18, 2016, and has the title "Big City; Rooting for the Robber Barons, at Least on the Screen.")






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