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300,000-Year-Old Homo Sapien Fossils Found



(p. A6) Fossils discovered in Morocco are the oldest known remains of Homo sapiens, scientists reported on Wednesday [June 7, 2017], a finding that rewrites the story of mankind's origins and suggests that our species evolved in multiple locations across the African continent.

"We did not evolve from a single 'cradle of mankind' somewhere in East Africa," said Philipp Gunz, a paleoanthropologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and a co-author of two new studies on the fossils, published in the journal Nature. "We evolved on the African continent."

Until now, the oldest known fossils of our species dated back just 195,000 years. The Moroccan fossils, by contrast, are roughly 300,000 years old. Remarkably, they indicate that early Homo sapiens had faces much like our own, although their brains differed in fundamental ways.


. . .


Resetting the clock on mankind's debut would be achievement enough. But the new research is also notable for the discovery of several early humans rather than just one, as so often happens, said Marta Mirazon Lahr, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Cambridge who was not involved in the new study.

"We have no other place like it, so it's a fabulous finding," she said.

The people at Jebel Irhoud shared a general resemblance to one another -- and to living humans. Their brows were heavy, their chins small, their faces flat and wide. But all in all, they were not so different from people today.

"The face is that of somebody you could come across in the Metro," Dr. Hublin said.

The flattened faces of early Homo sapiens may have something to do with the advent of speech, speculated Christopher Stringer, a paleoanthropologist at the Natural History Museum in London.

"We really are at very early stages of trying to explain these things," Dr. Stringer said.

The brains of the inhabitants of Jebel Irhoud, on the other hand, were less like our own.

Although they were as big as modern human brains, they did not yet have its distinctively round shape. They were long and low, like those of earlier hominins.

Dr. Gunz, of the Max Planck Institute, said that the human brain may have become rounder at a later phase of evolution. Two regions in the back of the brain appear to have become enlarged over thousands of years.

"I think what we see reflect adaptive changes in the way the brain functions," he said. Still, he added, no one knows how a rounder brain changed how we think.

The people of Jebel Irhoud were certainly sophisticated. They could make fires and craft complex weapons, such as wooden handled spears, needed to kill gazelles and other animals that grazed the savanna that covered the Sahara 300,000 years ago.

The flint is interesting for another reason: Researchers traced its origin to another site about 20 miles south of Jebel Irhoud. Early Homo sapiens, then, knew how to search out and to use resources spread over long distances.



For the full story, see:

Zimmer, Carl. "MATTER; Oldest Fossils of Homo Sapiens Found in Morocco, Altering History of Species." The New York Times (Thurs., JUNE 8, 2017): A6.

(Note: ellipsis, and bracketed date, added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date June 7, 2017, and has the title "MATTER; Oldest Fossils of Homo Sapiens Found in Morocco, Altering History of Our Species.")


I believe the two Nature articles mentioned above, are:

Hublin, Jean-Jacques, Abdelouahed Ben-Ncer, Shara E. Bailey, Sarah E. Freidline, Simon Neubauer, Matthew M. Skinner, Inga Bergmann, Adeline Le Cabec, Stefano Benazzi, Katerina Harvati, and Philipp Gunz. "New Fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the Pan-African Origin of Homo Sapiens." Nature 546, no. 7657 (June 8, 2017): 289-92.

Richter, Daniel, Rainer Grün, Renaud Joannes-Boyau, Teresa E. Steele, Fethi Amani, Mathieu Rué, Paul Fernandes, Jean-Paul Raynal, Denis Geraads, Abdelouahed Ben-Ncer, Jean-Jacques Hublin, and Shannon P. McPherron. "The Age of the Hominin Fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, and the Origins of the Middle Stone Age." Nature 546, no. 7657 (June 8, 2017): 293-96.






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