« Brooklyn Reinvented Through Creative Destruction | Main | "We Grow at Night, While the Government Sleeps" »


Connecticut Upholds Car Dealerships' "Lucrative Stranglehold" on New Car Market



(p. A23) Connecticut and Tesla should be a perfect fit. But lawmakers failed to act on a bill in this year's regular legislative session (for the third straight year) that would have legalized direct sales by Tesla, whose business model is rooted in selling directly to consumers.

The culprit? Heavy lobbying by the state's car dealerships.

Thanks to Connecticut's decades-old franchise laws, new cars can be sold only through licensed franchises independent of carmakers. Even though only about 5,500 zero-emission cars have sold in Connecticut since 2011, Tesla's effort to cut out the middlemen would undermine the lucrative stranglehold that car dealerships have on the new car market.


. . .


. . . , the National Automobile Dealers Association claimed franchise laws "keep prices competitive and low." However, a 2009 paper by an economist at the Justice Department's Antitrust Division instead concluded that "car customers would benefit from elimination of state bans on auto manufacturers' making direct sales to consumers." The paper pointed to a study by a Goldman Sachs analyst in 2000 that found that direct manufacturer sales could lower costs by 8.6 percent, with most of the savings resulting from more efficient matching between consumer demand and supply, and a subsequent reduction in inventory.

No wonder the Federal Trade Commission has criticized franchise laws as a "special protection" for these dealers -- "a protection that is likely harming both competition and consumers."



For the full commentary, see:

NICK SIBILLA. "'Connecticut Should Be Tesla Turf." The New York Times (Fri., JULY 7, 2017): A23.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the commentary has the title "Connecticut Should Be Tesla Country.")


The Department of Justice research paper, mentioned above, is:


Bodisch, Gerald R. "Economic Effects of State Bans on Direct Manufacturer Sales to Car Buyers." U.S. Department of Justice, Economic Analysis Group, Competition Advocacy Paper # EAG 09-1 CA. May 2009.







Post a comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

HP3D5006CropSmall.jpg






Archives















The StatCounter number above reports the number of "page loads" since the counter was installed late on 2/26/08. Page loads are defined on the site as "The number of times your page has been visited."


View My Stats