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The Ship that Held the Antikythera Mechanism Was Greek, Not Roman



(p. A12) A bronze statue's orphaned arm. A corroded disc adorned with a bull. Preserved wooden planks. These are among the latest treasures that date back to the dawn of the Roman Empire, discovered amid the ruins of the Antikythera shipwreck, a sunken bounty off the coast of a tiny island in Greece.


. . .


For decades people referred to it as a Roman shipwreck, like in Jacques Cousteau's documentary "Diving for Roman Plunder," but the team's findings since 2012 -- such as a chemical analysis of lead on the ship's equipment that trace it back to northern Greece and the personal possessions they found with Greek names etched on them -- are changing that narrative, Dr. Foley said. "It's starting to look an awful lot like a Greek-built, Greek-crewed ship, not a Roman-Italian vessel."



For the full story, see:

NICHOLAS ST. FLEUR. "A Bronze Arm Points to More Treasure Below." The New York Times (Sat., OCT. 7, 2017): A12.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date OCT. 5, 2017, and has the title "Bronze Arm Found in Famous Shipwreck Points to More Treasure Below.")






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