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High Demand for STEM Workers Is Mainly High for Workers in Info Tech



(p. 10) A working grasp of the principles of science and math should be essential knowledge for all Americans, said Michael S. Teitelbaum, an expert on science education and policy. But he believes that STEM advocates, often executives and lobbyists for technology companies, do a disservice when they raise the alarm that America is facing a worrying shortfall of STEM workers, based on shortages in a relative handful of fast-growing fields like data analytics, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and computer security.

"When it gets generalized to all of STEM, it's misleading," said Mr. Teitelbaum, a senior research associate in the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. "We're misleading a lot of young people."

Unemployment rates for STEM majors may be low, but not all of those with undergraduate degrees end up in their field of study -- only 13 percent in life sciences and 17 percent in physical sciences, according to a 2013 National Science Foundation survey. Computer science is the only STEM field where more than half of graduates are employed in their field.



For the full story, see:

STEVE LOHR. "Where the STEM Jobs Are/Aren't." The New York Times, Education Life Section (Sun., NOV. 5, 2017): 10.

(Note: the online version of the story has the date NOV. 1, 2017, and has the title "Where the STEM Jobs Are (and Where They Aren't).")






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