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Less Global Warming Since 1990 than IPCC Predicted



(p. C3) Though temperatures have increased, the rise is not accelerating and has fallen short of the most authoritative projections. In 1990, the first assessment report of the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicted that temperatures would rise at the rate of 0.3 degree Celsius per decade, equivalent to 3 degrees Celsius (or 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) a century. In fact, temperatures have risen since 1990 at between 0.121 and 0.198 degrees Celsius per decade, depending on which of the best data sets is used--that is, at a third to two-thirds of the rate projected by the IPCC.


. . .


Over the past several decades, the world has been getting slowly warmer, slightly wetter and less icy. It has also been no stormier, no more flood-prone and a touch less drought-prone. And sea level continues to creep slowly upward.



For the full commentary, see:

Benny Peiser and Matt Ridley. "Bad Weather Is No Reason for Climate Alarm." The Wall Street Journal Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018): C3.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date Jan. 12, 2018.)






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