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Italian Bureaucracy Leaves Innovative Restaurateur Feeling "Psychologically Violated"



(p. A7) ROME--The campaign leading up to Italy's national elections on March 4 [2018] has featured populist promises of largess but neglected what economists have long said is the real Italian disease: The country has forgotten how to grow.

Take Gianni Angelilli's pizzeria in downtown Rome. He uses an innovative dough mix and flexible cooking methods, drawing long lines and rave reviews. But Italy is too bureaucratic, the locals have no money and his ambition isn't what it used to be, Mr. Angelilli said. If he opens more outlets, they will be abroad.

"Now, foreigners have more desire to eat well than Italians," he said. "Italy is dead. Italy is finito."


. . .


Italian politics have become measurably more chaotic since the country's old party system--largely frozen during the Cold War--collapsed amid corruption scandals in the early 1990s. Data collected by Einaudi economist Luigi Guiso and others show that since 1992, coalitions have become more likely to crumble, lawmakers to defect and governments to need confidence votes in parliament. Politicians jostling for attention push more frequent, longer and more-complicated legislation.

"An excess has cluttered the bureaucratic machine," says Mr. Guiso. "The country has become cumbersome."

Yet the weakness of transient politicians has paradoxically made the public administration more powerful, at the same time as constant legal changes immobilize it, he says.

Mr. Guiso has practical experience. He is helping to set up a government-supported program to send young Italians to learn about entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley and at U.S. business schools, and he said Italian civil servants decided a tender offer inviting U.S. organizations to participate could be published in Italian only. After much persuasion, the civil servants agreed to publish the tender in English too--but insisted all applications must be in Italian, said Mr. Guiso. He said political friends apologized, saying there was nothing they could do.

Mr. Angelilli said his encounters with Italian bureaucracy while running his Pinsere pizzeria have left him feeling "psychologically violated." He said he had to pay a fine recently because his oven's air extraction, made to comply with European, national and regional laws, ran afoul of new city rules.



For the full story, see:

Marcus Walker and Giovanni Legorano. "The Real Italian Job: Rev Up Productivity." The Wall Street Journal (Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018): A7.

(Note: ellipsis, and bracketed year, added.)

(Note: the online version of the article has the date Feb. 27, 2018, and has the title "Italy: The Country That Forgot How to Grow.")






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