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Discovery of Several Centuries Worth of Rare-Earth Metals



(p. A13) TOKYO--Japan has hundreds of years' worth of rare-earth metal deposits in its waters, according to new research that reflects Tokyo's concern about China's hegemony over minerals used in batteries and electric vehicles.

The deposits were found in the Pacific Ocean seabed near remote Minamitori Island, about 1,150 miles southeast of Tokyo. Extracting them would likely be costly, but resource-poor Japan is pushing ahead with research in hopes of getting more control over next-generation technologies and weapon systems.

A roughly 965-square-mile seabed near the island contains more than 16 million tons of rare-earth oxides, estimated to hold 780 years' worth of the global supply of yttrium, 620 years' worth of europium, 420 years' worth of terbium and 730 years' worth of dysprosium, according to a study published this week in Nature Publishing Group's Scientific Reports.


. . .


In 2010, China pushed rare-earth prices up as much as 10 times by cutting its export quota on 17 elements by 40% from the previous year. It said it wanted to clean up a polluting industry, but the move left Japan seeking more independence from prices dictated by its neighbor. Japanese manufacturers have since lowered the amount of rare-earth metals in batteries and motors.



For the full story, see:

Mayumi Negishi. "In Rare-Earth Find, Hope of an Edge Against China." The Wall Street Journal (Thursday, April 12, 2018): A13.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date April 11, 2018, and has the title "Japan Hopes Rare-Earth Find Will Give It an Edge Against China.")


The study mentioned above, is:

Takaya, Yutaro, Kazutaka Yasukawa, Takehiro Kawasaki, Koichiro Fujinaga, Junichiro Ohta, Yoichi Usui, Kentaro Nakamura, Jun-Ichi Kimura, Qing Chang, Morihisa Hamada, Gjergj Dodbiba, Tatsuo Nozaki, Koichi Iijima, Tomohiro Morisawa, Takuma Kuwahara, Yasuyuki Ishida, Takao Ichimura, Masaki Kitazume, Toyohisa Fujita, and Yasuhiro Kato. "The Tremendous Potential of Deep-Sea Mud as a Source of Rare-Earth Elements." Scientific Reports 8, no. 1 (April 10, 2018): 1-8.






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