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"A Litigious, Protective Culture Has Gone Too Far"



(p. A1) SHOEBURYNESS, England -- Educators in Britain, after decades spent in a collective effort to minimize risk, are now, cautiously, getting into the business of providing it.


. . .


Limited risks are increasingly cast by experts as an experience essential to childhood development, useful in building resilience and grit.

Outside the Princess Diana Playground in Kensington Gardens in London, which attracts more than a million visitors a year, a placard informs parents that risks have been "intentionally provided, so that your child can develop an appreciation of risk in a controlled play environment rather than taking similar risks in an uncontrolled and unregulated wider world."

This view is tinged with nostalgia for an earlier Britain, in which children were tougher and more self-reliant. It resonates both with right-wing tabloids, which see it as a corrective to the cosseting of a liberal nanny state; and with progressives, drawn to a freer and more natural childhood.


. . .


(p. A12) Britain is one of a number of countries where educators and regulators say a litigious, protective culture has gone too far, leaching healthy risks out of childhood. Guidelines on play from the government agency that oversees health and safety issues in Britain state that "the goal is not to eliminate risk."



For the full story, see:

ELLEN BARRY. "In Britain, Learning to Accept Risk, and the Occasional 'Owie'." The New York Times, First Section (Sunday, March 11, 2018): A1 & A12.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date MARCH 10, 2018, and has the title "In Britain's Playgrounds, 'Bringing in Risk' to Build Resilience.")






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