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For Homicides, School Is Safer Than Home or Neighborhood



(p. A13) While homicide is among the leading causes of death for young people, school is a relative haven compared with the home or the neighborhood. According to the most recent federal data, between 1992 and 2015, less than 3 percent of homicides of children 5 to 18 years old occurred at school, and less than 1 percent of suicides.

"Especially in the younger grades, school is the safest place they can be," said Melissa Sickmund, director of the National Center for Juvenile Justice.


. . .


Chris Dorn, a senior analyst at Safe Havens International, said that after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in 2012, his organization saw an uptick in demand for its services, completing 1,000 school security assessments in one year. Interest is even greater now. By this fall, Safe Havens expects to have done 1,000 assessments just since the Parkland, Fla., shooting in February.

The group tells schools that the biggest safety risks have not changed, and are less likely to be mass shootings than "petty theft, assault, child abduction due to custody issues or sexual predators," Mr. Dorn said.



For the full story, see:


Dana Goldstein. "Grim Tally Obscures Statistical Reality: Schools Are 'Safest Place' for Children." The New York Times (Wednesday, May 23, 2018): A13.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date May 22, 2018, and has the title "Why Campus Shootings Are So Shocking: School Is the 'Safest Place' for a Child.")






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