« Hollywood Should Respond When "the Audience Starts Voting with Their Feet" | Main | Persistent Teenage Entrepreneur Sold Truffles to Fine Restaurants »


Buyers Trust Amazon's Delivery Speed



(p. B1) SEATTLE -- Olivia Zimmermann started her holiday shopping early this year, buying a Bluetooth speaker from Best Buy for her sister. It was supposed to arrive by Dec. 10 [2018], two weeks before Christmas.

The speaker never showed up -- and the post office said it had delivered the package to a different town. Best Buy apologized and offered to reship it. But Ms. Zimmermann, who works in marketing in Chicago, was over it.

"I just want a refund," she told the retailer, and then added: "At this point, I have already ordered from Amazon because I know for a fact it will be here when they say it will."

Amazon is far and away the leader in e-commerce, outpacing competitors like Walmart, Target and eBay. But its dominance is never more pronounced than in the nail-biter last-minute sprint before Christmas.

The company, based in Seattle, has had a two-decade-long obsession with shrinking the time from click to doorstep. It has built warehouses in more than 30 states and a sophisticated web of delivery methods, giving it a logistical advantage.

Amazon has used that edge to lead people to expect near instant gratification that, for a while, only it could deliver. The company built trust in its delivery speed with its Prime membership, which costs $119 a year and includes two-day shipping. This year, in the days leading up to Christmas, Amazon's share of online sales will increase by almost 50 percent -- to about half of all digital sales -- while most rivals fade, according to the market research firm Rakuten Intelligence.

"Amazon's ability to fulfill more quickly and effectively than competitors has been a key differentiator back to the earliest days," said Kenneth Cassar, an analyst with Rakuten Intelligence, which is an independent subsidiary of the Japanese e-retailer Rakuten.



For the full story, see:

Karen Weise. "'For Christmas, All They Want Is From Amazon." The New York Times (Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018): B1 & B7.

(Note: bracketed year added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date Dec. 21, 2018, and has the title "Last-Minute Shoppers Increasingly Trust Only Amazon to Deliver.")






Post a comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

HP3D5006CropSmall.jpg






Archives















The StatCounter number above reports the number of "page loads" since the counter was installed late on 2/26/08. Page loads are defined on the site as "The number of times your page has been visited."


View My Stats