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"The Tightest Labor Market Since 1969"



(p. B6) Crystal Romans, a recruiter in North Carolina, set up a face-to-face interview with a job candidate for a position at a large bank. She confirmed the time, 8:30 a.m., the night before and had a colleague stationed to walk the candidate into the room. When morning came, the candidate never showed.

Panicked, Ms. Romans sent text messages. She called. She left the applicant a voice mail. Silence.

"It's a running joke here of the level of audacity," Ms. Romans said of job candidates' escalating bad behavior, which frequently includes "ghosting," or vanishing without a trace on the people trying to hire them.


. . .


These are trying times for the nation's recruiters. Once as popular as prom kings and queens--and often overrun with hundreds of qualified job applications for an open position--recruiters find their standing has shifted in the booming economy. Instead of vying for their attention, would-be workers blow off recruiters' calls and ignore their emails.

Recruiters report they are stood up, kept waiting for appointments and regularly ridiculed online. That's because in the tightest labor market since 1969, job seekers have the upper hand, and they know it.



For the full story, see:

Chip Cutter. "For Job Recruiters, these Are Trying Times." The Wall Street Journal (Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2018): B6.

(Note: ellipsis added.)

(Note: the online version of the story has the date Dec. 19, 2018, and has the title "The Loneliest Job in a Tight Labor Market.")






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