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Big Data Crushes "Intuition, Skill and Experience"



(p. 14) Drawing on an eclectic bunch of anecdotes and studies, Tenner makes his way through four sectors in which "intuition, skill and experience" have been effectively crushed by "big data, algorithms and efficiency": media and culture, education, transportation and medicine.

A few of his examples:

Search algorithms have extended the ability to find scientific journal articles and books dating to the 19th century. In principle, this means scholars may encounter a broad range of research and discovery, dredge up forgotten work and possibly connect important dots. But in reality, as one sociologist found after studying citations in 35 million scientific journal articles from before and after the invention of the internet, researchers, beholden to search algorithms' tendency to generate self-reinforcing feedback loops, are now paying more attention to fewer papers, and in general to the more recent and popular ones -- actually strengthening rather than bucking prevailing trends.

GPS is great for getting from one point to another, but if you need more context for understanding your surroundings, it's fairly useless. We've all had experiences in which the shortest distance, as calculated by the app, can also be the most dangerous or traffic-clogged. Compare the efficiency of GPS with the three years aspiring London cabdrivers typically spend preparing for the arduous examination they must pass in order to receive their license. They learn to build a mental map of the entire city, to navigate under any circumstance, to find shortcuts and avoid risky situations -- all without any external, possibly fallible, help. Which is the more efficient, ultimately, the cabby or Google Maps?

In the early 2000s, electronic medical records and electronic prescribing appeared to solve the lethal problem of sloppy handwriting. The United States Institute of Medicine estimated in 1999 that 7,000 patients in the United States were dying annually because of errors in reading prescriptions. But the electronic record that has emerged to answer this problem, and to help insurers manage payments, is full of detailed codes and seemingly endless categories and subcategories. Doctors now have to spend an inordinate amount of time on data entry. One 2016 study found that for every hour doctors spent with patients, two hours were given over to filling out paperwork, leaving much less time to listen to patients, arguably the best way to avoid misdiagnoses.

Faced with all these "inefficiently efficient" technologies, what should we do? Tenner wants more balance.



For the full review, see:

Gal Beckerman. " Kicking the Geeks Where It Hurts." The New York Times Book Review (Sunday, June 30, 2018): 14.

(Note: the online version of the review has the date June 4, 2018, and has the title "What Silicon Valley Could Use More Of: Inefficiency.")


The book under review, is:

Tenner, Edward. The Efficiency Paradox: What Big Data Can't Do. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2018.






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