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Patent Troll Is Bankrupt After Victims Fight Back



(p. B5) Shipping & Transit LLC sued more than 100 mostly small companies in 2016, making it the largest filer of patent lawsuits that year. But when the Florida company recently declared bankruptcy, it valued its U.S. patents at just $1.

Its demise followed three cases where companies fought back and were awarded legal fees after Shipping & Transit decided not to pursue the patent claims against them. Judges in the cases awarded a total of more than $245,000 in attorneys' fees and costs to businesses in 2017.

Shipping & Transit doesn't sell tracking systems or anything else. Instead, it claims to own patents "for providing status messages for cargo, shipments and people," according to court filings. The company typically demanded licensing fees of $25,000 to $45,000 from companies it said were infringing on its patents. Most agree to pay small amounts to avoid costly litigation.


. . .


In one ruling, a U.S. district judge in Santa Ana, Calif., called Shipping & Transit's patent claims "objectively unreasonable" in light of a 2014 Supreme Court decision that held that certain kinds of abstract ideas weren't patentable.


. . .


Patent assertions by companies that don't make products and are primarily focused on making money off of patents have declined since the Supreme Court decision, but still "remain extremely high," said Shawn Ambwani, chief operating officer of Unified Patents, which specializes in challenging these types of assertions.

In another of the cases from 2017, a federal magistrate judge in West Palm Beach, Fla., said Shipping & Transit's actions suggest that the company's "strategy is predatory and aimed at reaping financial advantage from defendants who are unwilling or unable to engage in the expense of patent litigation.".



For the full commentary, see:

Ruth Simon. "Company That Filed Patent Suits Derails." The Wall Street Journal (Monday, Dec. 17, 2018): B5.

(Note: ellipses added.)

(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date Dec. 16, 2018, and has the title "Pushback Derails Company That Thrived on Patent Lawsuits.")






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